Destination Area: Mediterranean Sea
Length: 7 NIGHTS
Vessel: Star Flyer


Departs:

Piraeus (Port of Athens), Greece on August 3, 2019

Returns:

Piraeus, Greece (return) on August 10, 2019


Contact us.

For more information call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

Sail through Greece to Greece for 7 Nights

Explore at least 8 Stops. This voyage is a mixture of active but comfortable sailing.

Star Flyer and her sister ship Star Clipper are as fleet as the wind and as graceful as swans. These are 4-masted barkentines, and refle ...

Read more about the Star Flyer     



Piraeus (Port of Athens), Greece
Piraeus is Greece's third largest city in population and its biggest port, serving the city of Athens. First settled in the time of Themistocles, when the Long Walls were built (478 BC), the city was laid out to the plans of the architect Hippodamus. When Athens became a naval power, Piraeus gained considerably in importance. The ancient harbors of Piraeus were Zea and Munichia.

Zea, now Pasalimani, is one of the largest yacht marinas in the Mediterranean. Munichia is now a pretty harbor filled with yachts and fishing-boats and rung about with tavernas.

The commercial harbor of Piraeus is one of the most important in the Mediterranean. The city is in an industrial zone of particular importance for the Greek economy, but nevertheless its center has broad streets, spacious squares, tree-lined avenues, and parks.


At sea


Samos Strait Kusadasi, Turkey (sail through)


Kusadasi, Turkey (optional tour of Ephesus)
Kusadasi is a popular Turkish port of call for cruise ships, as not only is it a bustling resort town full of shops, bars and restaurants, but it is also the main access point for the famous archeological site at Ephesus, where extensive excavations have revealed an ancient city through which visitors can now wander and observe the wonders of a bygone civilization.

Not far from the pier you'll come across Meryemana, the House of the Virgin Mary, said to be where St. John took the mother of Jesus after the crucifixion. From there you'll enjoy a panoramic view of Ephesus below. Take time in Kusadasi for a little shopping and a cup of Turkish coffee.


Patmos, Greece
Patmos is not a big island, but it is one of the best known. The whole island breathes of faith and devotion.

Nevertheless, there is more to the island than its Christian reputation. There are many nice beaches along the jagged coastline, and the people grow fruits and olives on the green hills. The landscape invites you to take long walks and there is much to discover.


Amorgos, Greece
Amorgos is the easternmost island of the Greek Cyclades island group, and the nearest island to the neighboring Dodecanese island group.

Due to Amorgos' position opposite the ancient beaches of Ionian towns, it became one of the first places from which the Ionians passed through to the Cyclades Islands and onto the Greek mainland.

The ancient towers whose remains are scattered all over the island, the ancient tombs, the stone tools, the inscriptions, the vases and other antiquities are all powerful proof of the size of Amorgos' ancient civilization.


Mykonos, Greece
One of the most cosmopolitan of all the Greek Islands and quite justifiably attracting visitors from all over the world, Mykonos is a contrast of rocky hills and beautiful beaches. Hora, the capital, spreads around a colorful harbor in which fishing boats nestle side by side with luxury yachts. The brilliant white cubic houses with white-washed balconies built close together with little shops and tiny churches, make up the backstreets of the town. The harbor is overlooked by a variety of tavernas, and is a popular meeting place as the sun goes down, turning the brilliant whites to beautiful shades of pinks and reds.

Monemvassia, Greece
Monemvasia is located on a small peninsula off the east coast of the Peloponnese in the Greek prefecture of Laconia. The peninsula is linked to the mainland by a short causeway 650 feet in length. Its area consists mostly of a large plateau some 325 feet above sea level, up to 950 feet wide, the site of a powerful medieval fortress. The town walls and many Byzantine churches remain from the medieval period.

The town's name derives from two Greek words, mone and emvasia, meaning "single entrance". Its Italian form, Malvasia, gave its name to Malmsey wine. Monemvasia's nickname is the Gibraltar of the East or The Rock.


Piraeus, Greece (return)
Piraeus is Greece's third largest city in population and its biggest port, serving the city of Athens. First settled in the time of Themistocles, when the Long Walls were built (478 BC), the city was laid out to the plans of the architect Hippodamus. When Athens became a naval power, Piraeus gained considerably in importance. The ancient harbors of Piraeus were Zea and Munichia.

Zea, now Pasalimani, is one of the largest yacht marinas in the Mediterranean. Munichia is now a pretty harbor filled with yachts and fishing-boats and rung about with tavernas.

The commercial harbor of Piraeus is one of the most important in the Mediterranean. The city is in an industrial zone of particular importance for the Greek economy, but nevertheless its center has broad streets, spacious squares, tree-lined avenues, and parks.


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