Destination Area: Pacific Coast, U.S. to Central America
Length: 7 NIGHTS
Vessel: Wind Star


Departs:

Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica on December 30, 2017

Returns:

Colon, Panama on January 6, 2018


$3,399/person

For more information call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

In late 1986, the first commercial sailing vessel built in 60 years slipped out of a French dry-dock in Le Havre. Although the towering sails echoed a ...

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  • Educational onboard presentations from a knowledgeable Costa Rican Naturalist
  • Daylight transit of the historic Panama Canal while enjoying a festive Canal Crossing Destination Discovery Event
  • Golfo Dulce’s mangroves
  • estuaries
  • and rainforest teeming with flora and fauna
  • The amazing variety of marine life surrounding Isla Parida
  • Exploration of Manuel Antonio's unspoiled beaches and abundant animal life
  • Cultural performances on board from Costa Rican groups
  • Delicious beach barbecue on Isla Parida Dependent on weather and sea conditions and subject to change
  • Optional land extension packages featuring the Arenal Volcano
  • the Monteverde Cloudforest and Tortuguero National Park

Come find the natural and man-made wonders combined on this exotic voyage full of bucket list places and activities. Learn about the area from a local Naturalist on board, then take a Zodiac ashore and find rare experiences for yourself. Hike through Manuel Antonio National Park in search of its lovely beaches and abundant animal life. Soar high above the Quepos jungle floor as you zipline searching for such wildlife residents as monkeys, sloths, and toucans, then explore Golfo Dulce with some of the most intense rainforest landscapes in the world. Take a daylight transit the massive Panama Canal, one of the world's most stunning feats of engineering on a yacht that lets you see it all.

Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica
Puerto Caldera is, as the name implies, a port complex for both cruise ships and cargo vessels, its beginnings dating back to 1577. It serves as the primary access point from the Pacific Coast to the capital of San Jose.

The unspoiled natural beauty of the region is one of Puerto Caldera's main attractions. Its rain forests, starting just inside the coastline, continue up into the mountains, contain rivers, waterfalls, national parks and wildlife preserves. South of Puerto Caldera are two forest reserves, known for large and diverse populations of forest and aquatic birds. These are the Biological Reserve of Carara, and a preserve that encompasses Guayabo, Negritos and Los Pajaros islands.


Quepos, Costa Rica
This seaside town is the epitome of “jungle chic”. Fresh seafood is the order of the day - your taste buds will thank you for being such a savvy traveler. Quepos is best known as the gateway to Manuel Antonio National Park - Costa Rica’s crown jewel. White face monkeys squeal with delight as you trek jungle trails to a waterfall falling directly into the ocean as exotic birds fly overhead.

Golfo Ducle


Isla Parida, Panama


Balboa, Panama
Balboa, founded by the United States during the construction of the Panama Canal, was named after Vasco Núñez de Balboa, the first European to explore the eastern shores of the Pacific Ocean. The city is located at the Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal, and thrives on the business from Balboa Harbor, it's commercial port. In 1979 the Canal Zone, previously a U.S. territory, was ceded to Panama under the terms of the Panama Canal Treaties. The Panama Canal's Administration Building, former seat of the Canal Zone Government and Panama Canal Company, is located in Balboa Heights. Sightseeing high points include the Canal Administration Building and the fairly well-preserved architecture of the Canal Zone era, the Goethals Memorial, El Prado Boulevard, and the handicrafts markets.

Panama Canal, Panama
The Panama Canal is a major ship canal that traverses the Isthmus of Panama in Central America, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The construction of the canal was one of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken. It has had an enormous impact on shipping, as ships no longer have to travel the long and treacherous route via the Drake Passage and Cape Horn at the southernmost tip of South America. A ship sailing from New York to San Francisco via the canal travels 6,000 miles, well under half the distance of the previous 14,000 mile route around Cape Horn.

Colon, Panama
Colon is the Caribbean Ocean terminus of the Panama Canal. A veritable crossroads of the world, you will see all manner of vessels here, awaiting their turn to transit the canal. Only the largest war ships, tankers and cruise ships are too large for the canal.
The city is the capital of Panama's Colón Province. The city was founded in 1850 as one end of the Panama Railroad then under construction. For a number of years early in its history, the sizable United States emigré community called the town Aspinwall while the Hispanic community called it "Colón". The name "Colón" is in honor of Christopher Columbus.

Much of the city was burned during a Colombian civil war in 1885, and again in an accidental fire in 1915. In 1900 the population was some 3,000 people. It grew ten-fold with the building of the Panama Canal. In 1953 Colón was made a Free Trade Zone.


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