Destination Area: Caribbean Ocean/Gulf Of Mexico
Length: 7 NIGHTS
Vessel: Wind Surf


Departs:

Philipsburg, St. Maarten on January 20, 2018

Returns:

Philipsburg, St. Maarten (return) on January 27, 2018


$2,199/person.
For more information view pricing information for the Wind Surf
or call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

Wind Surf is the largest ship in our fleet, and among the most luxurious. Suites are twice the size of standard cabins, and all cabins have a ...

Read more about the Wind Surf     



  • Visit harbors and shops along your voyage
  • Swim in the most exotic waters
  • Snorkel/scuba dive amongst coral reefs
  • Stroll through quaint island villages
  • Visit Creole buildings greet locals and pay homage to the island’s history along celebrated Front Street
  • Walk to find the town’s abundance of restaurants/ store fronts/ and casinos that engage guests seeking an upbeat island experience.

Flavors, cultures and colors of the Caribbean's distinct and diverse heritage combine to make your voyage a delight for the senses

Philipsburg, St. Maarten
Philipsburg was founded in 1763 by John Philips, a Scottish captain in the Dutch navy, and soon became a bustling center of international trade. Two historic forts bear witness to Philipsburg's strategic importance in St. Martin's history: Fort Amsterdam and Fort Willem.

The main shopping district, Front Street, is in the heart of the city. Philipsburg has a port that is home to many cruise liners and tall ships.


Roseau, Dominica
Dominica is an island republic in the West Indies, specifically in the Windward Islands. The island has 148 miles of coastline, and covers 751 square miles of land area. The population of Dominica is under 75,000. Roseau is the island's capital. Dominica is lush and beautiful, and is home to some of the friendliest people in the West Indies. The island is known as the spot for ecotourists, with many parks and places to mountain climb, nature walk or explore. The diving is great here, too, but the beaches are less attractive than on other islands.

Pigeon Island, St. Lucia
Pigeon Island National Landmark is one of the Caribbean's most historic spots, an important monument of St. Lucia's history. It offers a vivid representation of the cultural and historical monuments of international, civil, military and marine cross currents, characteristic of West Indian history. Consisting of 44 acres of, it offers lots of photo opportunities. You can visit the interpretation center, eat at Jambe de Bois restaurant, walk up to Fort Rodney and view historical ruins. A living museum within a natural setting, Pigeon Island is being nurtured through careful protection and intelligent development to serve the intellectual, cultural, and recreational needs of all who visit this historic site. The picturesque, 44 acre island reserve, grasslands, dry tropical forests, beaches and twin peaks, off the north west end of St. Lucia, was originally surrounded by water but was joined to the mainland by a man made causeway in 1972. The Landmark is perfect for an outing tailored to your specific needs - With or without a guide, the island is an easy and accessible location for relaxing or exploring. Whatever your preference, don't forget your camera for breathtaking photo opportunities.

Les Saintes, French West Indies
Just south of Guadeloupe, these idyllic tropical islands float like jewels in the Caribbean sea. Les Saintes are perfect for the kind of sailor who relishes unspoiled tropical beauty and the serenity that comes from doing next to nothing on a vacation. Only two of the eight little islands are inhabited, and Terre-de-Haut is the one travelers visit first. With superb beaches, lovely bays, great snorkeling and fascinating historical sites, this small island has a charming village with excellent restaurants, interesting shops and unique art galleries. The other populated island, peaceful Terre-de-Bas, is only a few minutes by boat from Terre-de-Haut. There are only 3,000 inhabitants in the islands. About half of them live on Terre-de-Haut with just a few dozen four-wheel drive vehicles on its roads.

Charlestown, Nevis
Charlestown was built in a protected area on the Leeward side of Nevis, situated between Fort Charles and the Fort Black Rocks. Most of the original buildings were destroyed over time by earthquakes, leading to the common practice of building a series of wooden upper floors over a stone ground floor. It has a population of 1500. It is the main centre for government,education,trade and business in Nevis.

The city is the birthplace of Alexander Hamilton. Charlestown has many important buildings such as the Post Office, Treasury Building, Court House,Public Library,Police Station and the Alexandra Hospital. At the northern end of town is the Bath Hotel and Spring House, which were famoushealth resorts during the 19th century. There are also two museums, the Museum of Nevis History and the Nelson Museum. Memorial Square commemorates all Nevisian soldiers who died during World Wars I & II. There is one mall, the Cotton Ginnery Mall which supplies most of Nevis resident's shopping needs.


Charlestown, Nevis
Charlestown was built in a protected area on the Leeward side of Nevis, situated between Fort Charles and the Fort Black Rocks. Most of the original buildings were destroyed over time by earthquakes, leading to the common practice of building a series of wooden upper floors over a stone ground floor. It has a population of 1500. It is the main centre for government,education,trade and business in Nevis.

The city is the birthplace of Alexander Hamilton. Charlestown has many important buildings such as the Post Office, Treasury Building, Court House,Public Library,Police Station and the Alexandra Hospital. At the northern end of town is the Bath Hotel and Spring House, which were famoushealth resorts during the 19th century. There are also two museums, the Museum of Nevis History and the Nelson Museum. Memorial Square commemorates all Nevisian soldiers who died during World Wars I & II. There is one mall, the Cotton Ginnery Mall which supplies most of Nevis resident's shopping needs.


Basseterre, St. Kitts
Unlike other islands where traditional lifestyles have been stamped out by mass tourism, St. Kitts boasts a thriving West Indian culture. Her lush and forested slopes rise gracefully to mist-shrouded peaks.

A worthwhile site for history buffs, the imposing 17th century fortress (Brimstone Hill) looms over green fields of sugar cane and banana trees. St. Kitts’ was the first successful colony in the British West Indies. Indeed, when viewed from the top of Brimstone Hill, the “Gibraltar of the Caribbean” appears to dominate everything in the Southern Sea.

Originally discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1493, the island was named for his patron saint, St. Christopher. The British later shortened the name to St. Kitts. The island was colonized beginning in 1623, first by the French, and then by English settlers. Britain and France held the island jointly from 1628 into the 1700's, with periods of fighting. By 1783, the treaty of Paris ceded St. Kitts and Nevis to Great Britain.

Basseterre has been the capital of St. Kitts since 1727, and remains the capital of the Federation of St. Kitts and Nevis today. It offers elegant Georgian architecture and colorful shopping.


Philipsburg, St. Maarten (return)
Return for disembarkation.

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