Destination Area: Caribbean Ocean/Gulf Of Mexico
Length: 10 NIGHTS
Vessel: Sea Cloud II


Departs:

St. John's, Antigua on January 15, 2018

Returns:

Bridgetown, Barbados on January 25, 2018


Call for pricing. Fare will include all meals, non-alcoholic beverages and on-board lectures. Shore excursions may be included in the fare.

Call for air.


For more information call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

SAILING AROUND ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES WITH 9 PORT/ISLAND VISITS ALONG THE WAY: 10 Night Voyage From St. John's, Antigua to Bridgetown, Barbados

Sea Cloud II is a luxurious 3-masted Barque, spreading almost 30 thousand square feet of canvas in more than 20 sails. Sailing on her is an experienc ...

Read more about the Sea Cloud II     



  • Hike on many trails throughout your voyage
  • Swim on choice beaches
  • Snorkel with instruction
  • Take in many historic buildings and places
  • Shop in towns along the way
  • Visit museums and learn important historic facts
  • Night entertainment at local watering holes can be fun.

St John's, the capital city of the island nation of Antigua and Barbuda, in the Lesser Antilles, has been the administrative center since the islands were first colonized in 1632. The official language is English, but the locals speak a patois, a mixture of English, local languages and some other European languages.

As a free port under Swedish rule, Gustavia provided a trade and supply center for the various warring factions. When a sea captain captured a prize or raided a settlement, he could sell the booty in St. Barths, and at the same time resupply his ship. Overflowing warehouses surrounded a harbor packed with ships from many nations, and a mercantile and architectural tradition was established that has lingered to the present day. Today, the town has adjusted itself to satisfy the increasing number of visiting tourists. Restaurants, boutiques, and gift shops now line streets once busy with merchants, merchant seamen, and adventurers.

Soufriere is a fishing town on St. Lucia's southwest coast. Surrounded by lush tropical rainforest, Soufriere sits below the Pitons, St. Lucia's landmark volcanic peaks. You can wander with your camera, stop at a local seafood restaurant, or buy some treats to eat from a street vendor, or perhaps linger at a bar for a rum drink. There are spas for massage, and hot, volcanic spring-fed mineral baths for soaking. Visit an old sugar plantation. Rent a trail bike to ride along the French Wall Trail, an old hand-built stone wall, or any of several other trails. Go diving among the coral formations on the reef in the Soufriere Marine Management Area. Or try snorkeling if you prefer. Take a walk through the rainforest, visit a botanical gardens, or use binoculars to seek the elusive St. Lucia parrot.

A key feature of the Union Island region is the Tobago Cays National Marine Park. The Tobago Cays are a group of small uninhabited islands surrounded by reefs – snorkeling, scuba diving, swimming with the sea turtles are all favorite pastimes of visitors. Entry to the park (for visitors) costs EC$10/person/day – park fees can be paid in Clifton at the Custom's Offices, the Tobago Cays Marine Park office at the waterfront, or in the park itself from park rangers.

On the wild and rugged east coast of Barbados, the isolated beaches are the color of sunrise, the red sands having blown all the way across the Atlantic from the Sahara. The eastern most island of the Windwards, and indeed, of the entire Caribbean, reaches out to Africa and the Old World, as if not quite part of the New. Bridgetown, Barbados is an interesting town full of contrasts. George Washington actually slept here! Trafalgar Square reminds you that the laid back, rum-and-fun-loving island’s British-influenced heritage includes revered traditions like cricket and high tea.

St. Johns, Antigua (& Barbuda)
St John's, the capital city of the island nation of Antigua and Barbuda, in the Lesser Antilles, has been the administrative center since the islands were first colonised in 1632. The nation achieved its independence from Great Britain in 1981.

Arawak and Carib Amerindian tribes lived on the islands when Christopher Columbus first arrived in 1493. Early settlements were made by Spain and France. Subsequently the English formed a colony in 1667, bringing African slaves to work sugar plantations. Slavery was abolished in 1834.

Most of the present day population is descended from those slaves. Europeans, principally British and Portuguese, make up the remainder. The official language is English, but the locals speak a patois, a mixture of English, local languages and some other European languages.


Gustavia, St. Barthelemy (France)
Discovered by Columbus in 1493, and named for his brother Bartolomeo, St. Barths was first settled in 1648 by French colonists from the nearby island of St. Kitts.

This original settlement was not a successful. In 1651 the island was sold to the Knights of Malta.

France repurchased the island in 1878. The free port status remained, and does to this day, along with such Swedish mementos as bits of architecture, a cemetery, a few street signs and, of course, the name of the harbor and capital, Gustavia.

In 1957, American millionaire David Rockefeller bought a property: the notoriety of the island quickly grew and its transformation as an upscale tourist destination was underway. In 1967, Britain cut loose most of their Caribbean dependencies because they had become a losing proposition.

During the last twenty years the resident population of St. Barths has more than doubled. Fewer natives are leaving, and growing number of outsiders are arriving to make an island home for themselves, especially from Metropolitan France.


Basseterre, St. Kitts and Nevis


At Sea


Cabrits, Dominica
Cabrits National Park is at the north end of the island, north of Portsmouth on a peninsula. The park protects tropical forest, coral reefs and wetlands. There are hiking trails and an English garrison called Fort Shirley.

Soufriere, St. Lucia
Soufriere is a fishing town on St. Lucia's southwest coast. Surrounded by lush tropical rainforest, Soufriere sits below the Pitons, St. Lucia's landmark volcanic peaks. The town is small and simple, with a central square on which is located the Church of the Assumption, and narrow streets lined with bright-painted houses. You can wander with your camera, stop at a local seafood restaurant, or buy some treats to eat from a street vendor, or perhaps linger at a bar for a rum drink. The people are friendly and fun-loving. There are spas for massage, and hot, volcanic spring-fed mineral baths for soaking. Visit an old sugar plantation. Rent a trail bike to ride along the French Wall Trail, an old hand-built stone wall, or any of several other trails. Go diving among the coral formations on the reef in the Soufriere Marine Management Area. Or try snorkeling if you prefer. Take a walk through the rainforest, visit a botanical gardens, or use binoculars to seek the elusive St. Lucia parrot. You'll not lack for things to do on this laid-back island.

Kingstown, St. Vincent and Grenadines


Tobago Cays (St. Vincent & Grenadines)
The five small islands of the Tobago Cays are an archipelago with extensive coral reefs located in the Southern Grenadines, and make up the Tobago Cays Marine Park. These uninhabited cays offer heavenly lagoons with green turtles, colorful fishes and crystal clear waters.

Chatham Bay, Union Island (St. Vincent & Grenadines)
A key feature of the Union Island region is the Tobago Cays National Marine Park. The Tobago Cays are a group of small uninhabited islands surrounded by reefs – snorkeling, scuba diving, swimming with the sea turtles are all favorite pastimes of visitors. Entry to the park (for visitors) costs EC$10/person/day – park fees can be paid in Clifton at the Custom's Offices, the Tobago Cays Marine Park office at the waterfront, or in the park itself from park rangers.

St. George's, Grenada
An attractive colonial-era town spilling down a hillside above the Carenage, with its horseshoe-shaped harbor, Grenada's capital of ST GEORGE'S received the full brunt of Hurricane Ivan's high winds, and the bevy of new terracotta-coloured roofs stand in testament to the power of the wind.

St George's won't take more than a day to explore, and it's worth taking time away from the beach to do so. Though the market is at its liveliest on Saturday morning, most shops close on Saturday afternoons, Sundays and public holidays, making the town a quiet place during those times – except when a cruise ship moors at the spanking new docks, in which case the town explodes into a frenzy of activity, market stalls spring up on shore, restaurants and bars fill up, street vendors and local guides come out in force.


Port Elizabeth, Bequia (St. Vincent & Grenadines)


Bridgetown, Barbados
On the wild and rugged east coast of Barbados, the isolated beaches are the colour of sunrise, the red sands having blown all the way across the Atlantic from the Sahara. The eastern most island of the Windwards, and indeed, of the entire Caribbean, reaches out to Africa and the Old World, as if not quite part of the New. Bridgetown, Barbados is an interesting town full of contrasts. George Washington actually slept here! Trafalgar Square reminds you that the laid back, rum-and-fun-loving island’s British-influenced heritage includes revered traditions like cricket and high tea.

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