Destination Area: Caribbean Ocean/Gulf Of Mexico
Length: 12 NIGHTS
Vessel: Diamant


Departs:

Grenada on January 7, 2018

Returns:

St. Lucia on January 19, 2018


Fare starts at $4,475. per passenger, double-occupancy for a Navigator Cabin and $5,875. for the Owner's Suite. Call for single-occupancy rate.

Voyage is all inclusive (soft drinks, dinner wine/beer and a rum punch, port charges/taxes).

Call for round trip air fare and advance booking discount.

Please board no later than noon on the day of departure.


For more information call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

SAILING IN THE WINDWARD ISLANDS WITH APPROXIMATELY 9 ISLAND VISITS ALONG THE WAY: 12 Night Voyage From Grenada to St. Lucia

Diamant, a 101-foot square topsail schooner, provides the unique, fun-filled casual style known as "barefoot cruising." She accommodates an in ...

Read more about the Diamant     



  • Take in the beauty and aroma of the Caribbean
  • Fill your capacity for discovery and adventure
  • Swim at various beaches or off the ship
  • Explore sea life while on shore
  • Snorkel among reefs
  • Enjoy visiting numerous islands in the Grenadines
  • Visit nutmeg plantations in the "Spice Isles" - Grenada and go to the capital of St. George's to see colorful Colonial homes
  • Bequia is the most perfect island for you with sandy beaches and fine restaurants
  • Visit a quaint old church in Mayreau and stroll around the small village
  • Walk around Mustique's rocky headlands/ dramatic hilltops and pristine palm fringed beaches
  • Tobago Cays is a cluster of 5 uninhabited islands
  • Look around many lagoons full of green turtles/ coral reefs/ colorful fish and crystal clear waters
  • Make the most of your time at Union Island where you can kite surf
  • Visit the Tobago Cays/ dive and snorkel/ hike and watch turtles and birds
  • In the south of St. Lucia notice old plantations/ hidden beaches and the geologic wonder ot the Pitons.

Cruising the Windward Islands with 10 island visits along the way.

Grenada
Grenada is the fruit basket of the Caribbean. The fertile soils of the 'Spice Island' are perfect for growing cinnamon, cloves, and cocoa beans. Banana trees grow as tall as palms along the sides of the road. The scents of ginger, vanilla, almond and nutmeg linger in the air, while the countryside explodes with every tropical fruit imaginable. The bustling farmers' market in picturesque St. George is one of the Caribbean's liveliest and most replendent.

This old and busy small seaport is part of an 18th-century British West Indian colonial town climbing the steep hills. Small, stucco, stone and brick buildings with winding narrow cobblestone streets reflect both the French and English legacy of this island. Large fruit-ships are loading, small ships coming and going, inter-island "one spar" schooners making the run to Trinidad, fishing boats landing their catch, the town market selling spices and produce and engaging in lively banter, marathon domino games in back street shops and reggae music pulsing on every corner. Ancient rum factories at 17th-century cane plantations, island "jump ups" (dance parties). At Grenada you must take in the whole island: The Fishing Town of Guave, stunning blazing beauty of Grand Anse Beach, and spice plantations still using the equipment of plantation days. If there is a Calypso Competition advertised then we must attend. No mere contest, this is a rank-off competition of the first order. Beautiful jungle waterfalls, and you must try the grilled chicken at a roadside barbeque. Busy, bustling, and very, very West Indian.


Bequía, Grenadines
Pretty as a picture describes our beloved Bequia. You’ll be captivated by the island’s charm while strolling along the lovely harbor with its shops, restaurants, and pastel-painted gingerbread homes. There’s a long tradition of boat building and you’ll find a slew of handcrafted model ships, old nautical charts, and rare sailing books to bring back home.

Canouan Island, Grenadines
Canouan is a tiny island, one of the Grenadines Islands belonging to St Vincent. Its capital village is Charlestown. A barrier reef runs along the Atlantic side of the dry island. It is outlined with rounded hills beneath the “Maho”, a 900-foot tall Mount Mahoult, the highest point on the island. Two bays, Glossy and Friendship, separate the southern side of the island.

Canouan's history goes back more than 200 years before Christ, when a cultivated tribe called the Arawaks arrived on the island. These new residents brought fire-burners, plants and animals, basic farming and fishing skills with them. They lived in peace for 1500 years until a tribe of fierce fighters called the Caribs, invaded and killed the Arawak men and took off with their woman.

More than 200 years after Columbus, Europeans established a kind of permanent settlement. The island's mountainous and heavily forested geography allowed the Caribs to defend against European settlement here longer than on almost any other island in the Caribbean. After the Caribs were defeated on other islands they joined slaves who had escaped repression on Barbados, as well as those who had survived shipwrecks near St. Vincent and Bequia, by following the current and trade winds westward to St. Vincent.

The mixed descendants of the island warriors and the freed Africans (who became known as the Black Caribs), with their common distrust and disgust for the Europeans, proved to be a fearsome foe. The Caribs feared complete domination so they allowed the French to construct a settlement on the island in 1719. The French brought slaves to work their plantations.

St. Vincent is the only Caribbean country where whale hunting is allowed. A small group of hunters carries on the tradition off the small island of Bequia.


Grenada
Grenada is the fruit basket of the Caribbean. The fertile soils of the 'Spice Island' are perfect for growing cinnamon, cloves, and cocoa beans. Banana trees grow as tall as palms along the sides of the road. The scents of ginger, vanilla, almond and nutmeg linger in the air, while the countryside explodes with every tropical fruit imaginable. The bustling farmers' market in picturesque St. George is one of the Caribbean's liveliest and most replendent.

This old and busy small seaport is part of an 18th-century British West Indian colonial town climbing the steep hills. Small, stucco, stone and brick buildings with winding narrow cobblestone streets reflect both the French and English legacy of this island. Large fruit-ships are loading, small ships coming and going, inter-island "one spar" schooners making the run to Trinidad, fishing boats landing their catch, the town market selling spices and produce and engaging in lively banter, marathon domino games in back street shops and reggae music pulsing on every corner. Ancient rum factories at 17th-century cane plantations, island "jump ups" (dance parties). At Grenada you must take in the whole island: The Fishing Town of Guave, stunning blazing beauty of Grand Anse Beach, and spice plantations still using the equipment of plantation days. If there is a Calypso Competition advertised then we must attend. No mere contest, this is a rank-off competition of the first order. Beautiful jungle waterfalls, and you must try the grilled chicken at a roadside barbeque. Busy, bustling, and very, very West Indian.


Mayreau, Grenadine Islands
The island of Mayreau is a true break from reality, with only one road, virtually no development, and farm animals outnumbering the inhabitants. One of the Grenadines, in the larger chain of Windward Islands, it has beautiful beaches, and plenty of solitude. View it as your own private island.

Mustique, Grenadine Islands
Mustique is a 1,400 acre private island in the Grenadines owned and operated by the Mustique Company, shareholders and villa owners dedicated to protecting the island’s natural beauty, tranquility and privacy. The island is surrounded by pristine white beaches and crystal clear turquoise waters, and is cooled by gentle trade winds. The island's constant warm climate, and unspoiled island lifestyle attracts sophisticated international guests, many who eventually become owners. Mustique is such a peaceful island that even during peak season, there is little traffic, congestion or noise. Many of the roads are not paved and there is minimal signage, so there is a very non-commercial feeling to the island. All of the power and telephone lines are underground. You may find yourself totally alone on the island’s white sand beaches, tranquil and uncrowded.

Petite, Martinique
The island is volcanic in origin, about 586 acres and dominated by a 750-foot high mountain in the middle. One can walk or hike around the island in less than one hour. Atop the mountain one can get a bird's eye view of all the neighboring Grenadine islands or the coastline right around Petite, Martinique

The people of Petite Martinique share a rich cultural heritage. If you're lucky, you may get a chance to see some traditional ceremonies (such as the famous Big Drum Dance), witness the occasional tombstone fest, the launching of a locally built wooden boat (Petite Martinique is known for its boat building), or, even a traditional wedding ceremony featuring cake dancing and flag dancing (rituals unique only to the Petite Martinique wedding.).

Petite Martinique is a sea faring community. Most of the island's men are either fishermen or sailors on bulk cargo ships where they rank from ordinary crewman to top officers. As a matter of fact, the seamen of this island are so good at seamanship that they are constantly on demand by large cargo ship companies. .


St. Vincent, Grenadine Islands
St. Vincent glimmers like an emerald in the sea. A boat ride along the coast is the best way to appreciate the island’s volcanic origins; and visit the Falls of Baleine, a breath taking waterfall that spills from a mass of foliage into a rockbound pool. Kingstown, the capital, is an 18th century town worth exploring. A walking tour begins at the docks and leads to the farmers’ market (Saturday mornings), past shops, restaurants, and old churches. Beachcombers will find beautiful black sand on the leeward side, proof of the island’s volcanic birth. Its botanical gardens are the oldest in the hemisphere.

Sandy Island, Anguilla (Brit. Overseas Territory)


St. Lucia
This island is a nature lover's paradise. Here, the dueling Piton peaks serve as an inspiring landmark for sailors. You'll have a chance to visit waterfalls, hot springs, botanical gardens, and the world's only 'drive-in' volcano. Hiking boots are what you'll need for trekking tails through the Rainforest Preserve, a favorite for bird watchers. The forest is loaded with wild orchids, giant ferns and towering stands of bamboo.

St. Vincent Island
St. Vincent glimmers like an emerald in the sea. A boat ride along the coast is the best way to appreciate the island’s volcanic origins; and visit the Falls of Baleine, a breath taking waterfall that spills from a mass of foliage into a rockbound pool. Kingstown, the capital, is an 18th century town worth exploring. A walking tour begins at the docks and leads to the farmers’ market (Saturday mornings), past shops, restaurants, and old churches. Beachcombers will find beautiful black sand on the leeward side, proof of the island’s volcanic birth. Its botanical gardens are the oldest in the hemisphere.

Tobago Cays (St. Vincent & Grenadines)
The five small islands of the Tobago Cays are an archipelago with extensive coral reefs located in the Southern Grenadines, and make up the Tobago Cays Marine Park. These uninhabited cays offer heavenly lagoons with green turtles, colorful fishes and crystal clear waters.

Union Island, , Grenadines
The most southerly island of the Grenadines, Union Island is a mere three miles by one mile, garnished with two dramatic peaks and a population of 2000. Once you land on shore, you won’t want to leave. Union Island is a sailor’s delight offering pretty anchorages, a couple of rowdy bars and some good restaurants. There is mile after mile of undisturbed sand and wild mangoes for the taking.

Young Island, Grenadines
Young Island is an exotic private island resort in the Grenadines, adjacent to St. Vincent. The tiny island, just 25 acres, is covered with tropical flowering plants, palm trees, and lots of green foliage. The white sand beach extending part way around the island is lined with cottages and beach huts. If you have the chance, stop at the famous Coconut Bar.

St. Lucia
This island is a nature lover's paradise. Here, the dueling Piton peaks serve as an inspiring landmark for sailors. You'll have a chance to visit waterfalls, hot springs, botanical gardens, and the world's only 'drive-in' volcano. Hiking boots are what you'll need for trekking tails through the Rainforest Preserve, a favorite for bird watchers. The forest is loaded with wild orchids, giant ferns and towering stands of bamboo.

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