Destination Area: Caribbean Ocean/Gulf Of Mexico
Length: 7 NIGHTS
Vessel: Royal Clipper


Departs:

Barbados on December 30, 2017

Returns:

Bridgetown, Barbados (return) on January 6, 2018


Prices start at $2,220 per person, double occupancy. There may be a discount for children under 18 if accompanied by an adult. Port charge is $235. per person. Single supplement is 150% for category 2 thru 6 (other categories 200%).

Early booking discounts including free air from select USA cities may be available.

Call for clarification of the above as costs may change.

Call for air.


For more information call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

SAILING IN THE WINDWARD ISLANDS WITH 8 ISLAND VISITS: 7 Night, Round Trip Voyage From Bridgetown, Barbados



The flagship of Star Clippers' line, The Royal Clipper is the largest full-rigged sailing ship in the world and the only five-masted full-rigged ship ...

Read more about the Royal Clipper     



  • Relax and enjoy the entire trip drenched with sun
  • Swim off white sandy beaches
  • Snorkel among colorful coral reefs
  • Explore a ship wreck
  • Walk palm tree lined streets in commercial areas
  • Shop til you drop
  • Imbibe in scrumptious French cuisine.

Decisions, decisions. With so many lovely Caribbean Islands to visit, you'll have so many choices of things to do. Perhaps you'll choose between a morning jog on the beach or a quick nine holes to start your day, Decide on an afternoon filled with snorkeling and sailing. Lying on the beach sipping your favorite drink and a nap after wards is a good choice, Pick from a variety of dining options and lively entertainment in the evening will prove to be your most difficult decision of your voyage.

Bridgetown, Barbados
On the wild and rugged east coast of Barbados, the isolated beaches are the colour of sunrise, the red sands having blown all the way across the Atlantic from the Sahara. The eastern most island of the Windwards, and indeed, of the entire Caribbean, reaches out to Africa and the Old World, as if not quite part of the New. Bridgetown, Barbados is an interesting town full of contrasts. George Washington actually slept here! Trafalgar Square reminds you that the laid back, rum-and-fun-loving island’s British-influenced heritage includes revered traditions like cricket and high tea.

Rodney Bay, St. Lucia
Rodney Bay is just a few miles from Castries, the capital of St. Lucia, on the northwest coast of the island. The 80-acre man-made lagoon is named for British admiral George Rodney, who sailed the English Navy to attack and decimate the French fleet in 1780. At adjacent historic Pigeon Island, connected by a causeway to the main island, you'll see the ruins of Admiral Rodney's naval station, and a beautiful park filled with tropical trees and flowers. You can enjoy exploring the ruins, and go swimming or snorkeling from the pristine white beach.

In Rodney Bay you are likely to see the tall ship Unicorn, which filled the role of a pirate ship in the movie Pirates of the Caribbean, along with another brig, Lady Washington, now returned to Puget Sound. You can sign onboard Unicorn for a day's pirate cruise along the west coast of St. Lucia, an adventure that includes a treasure hunt, a raid on the Botanical Gardens, and live cannon fire. In the marina you may see some of the large ocean-going yachts which compete in the annual Trans-Atlantic race which ends in Rodney Bay.


Cabrits, Dominica
Cabrits National Park is at the north end of the island, north of Portsmouth on a peninsula. The park protects tropical forest, coral reefs and wetlands. There are hiking trails and an English garrison called Fort Shirley.

Falmouth Harbour, Antigua
Falmouth Harbour is the home of the Antigua Yacht Club, the host club for yachts sailing in Antigua Race Week and the Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta. It is situated on the south side of Antigua, at the opposite end of the island from St. John's the major cruise ship port on Antigua.

During the race & regatta weeks, Falmouth Harbour is filled with some of the most beautiful classic yachts, and the speediest of racing yachts. The races are held just outside the harbor entrance, ranging up to 8 miles offshore. These races are international events, attracting the best of the big yacht sailors from around the world.

Right next door to Falmouth Harbour is English Harbour, and the famous Nelson's Dockyard, Naval Base for the British Caribbean fleet during the great age of sail, from the late 1700's until it was abandoned in 1889. Nelson's Dockyard has since been restored. You can see the capstans used to warp ships into the sheltered anchorage, the remains of a sail loft, shore batteries for the protection of the ships in harbor, Clarence House built for soon-to-be crowned King William IV when he was captain of H.M.S Pegasus, one of the ships in Horatio Nelson's fleet. Around the harbor you can find Shirley Heights and the colonial observation post for the harbor, now a good vantage point to watch the racing yachts maneuver.


Basseterre, St. Kitts (am), South Friar's Bay beach, St. Kitts (pm)
Unlike other islands where traditional lifestyles have been stamped out by mass tourism, St. Kitts boasts a thriving West Indian culture. Her lush and forested slopes rise gracefully to mist-shrouded peaks.

A worthwhile site for history buffs, the imposing 17th century fortress (Brimstone Hill) looms over green fields of sugar cane and banana trees. St. Kitts’ was the first successful colony in the British West Indies. Indeed, when viewed from the top of Brimstone Hill, the “Gibraltar of the Caribbean” appears to dominate everything in the Southern Sea.

Originally discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1493, the island was named for his patron saint, St. Christopher. The British later shortened the name to St. Kitts. The island was colonized beginning in 1623, first by the French, and then by English settlers. Britain and France held the island jointly from 1628 into the 1700's, with periods of fighting. By 1783, the treaty of Paris ceded St. Kitts and Nevis to Great Britain.

Basseterre has been the capital of St. Kitts since 1727, and remains the capital of the Federation of St. Kitts and Nevis today. It offers elegant Georgian architecture and colorful shopping.

Frier's Beach is a clean and friendly place where a variety of sea life, including squid and sea urchin reside. Chairs are available.


Isle des Saintes, Guadeloupe
The Îles des Saintes (literally, "Islands of the (female) Saints"), also called simply Les Saintes, are a group of islands within the French overseas department of Guadeloupe. They are located about 8 miles southwest of Guadeloupe and as such belong to the Lesser Antilles. Their land area is 4.9 sq. miles and they had a population of 2,883 inhabitants at the 2005 census.

Beach Call, Martinique
Your Captain will anchor off one of Martinique's many beautiful beaches. Water sports and beach combing are yours to enjoy.

Bridgetown, Barbados (return)
Return to Bridgetown for disembarkation

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