Destination Area: Caribbean Ocean/Gulf Of Mexico
Length: 14 NIGHTS
Vessel: Sea Cloud II


Departs:

Bridgetown, Barbados on December 21, 2017

Returns:

Bridgetown, Barbados (return) on January 4, 2018


Fare begins at $7,695. (if booked before 6/30/17) per passenger, double occupancy. Fare includes all meals, non-alcoholic beverages and on-board lectures. Shore excursions may be included in the fare.

Call for air.


For more information call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

SAILING TO STUNNING VOLCANIC SCENERY AND ISLAND HIDEAWAYS ON THE SUNNY SIDE OF THE LESSER ANTILLES AND THE GRENADINES- 13 PORT VISITS: 14 Night, Round Trip Voyage From Bridgetown, Barbados

Sea Cloud II is a luxurious 3-masted Barque, spreading almost 30 thousand square feet of canvas in more than 20 sails. Sailing on her is an experienc ...

Read more about the Sea Cloud II     



  • Notice in Bridgetown old colonial houses reminding one of the high life of the plantation owners who once occupied colorful houses
  • Take a walk along the coastline with sandy beaches and turquoise sea surrounded by colorful coral reefs
  • At Soufriere you will see famous volcanic cones now a UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Stroll along the Botanical Gardens with artistic tropical arrangements
  • Cabrits boasts some of the highest mountains in the Lesser Antilles
  • Take a tour of the Cabrits National Park to see two extinct volcanoes
  • As you approach North Sound you will feel the calming of the sea- it being a protective cove
  • Go to Saba Rock or the Bitter End Yacht Club for a delicious meal
  • Visit "Foxy" at Great Harbor to get a unique and famous cocktail- reputed to be the best drink in the Lesser Antilles
  • Here one must go to the fine grained sandy beach
  • People watch at St. Barts where David Rockefeller built an estate in 1957 and today is the away home for many international jet setters
  • Take a stroll along the waterside promenade in Iles des Saintes where you will find boutiques/ cafes/ bars and fine restaurants
  • Visit Fort Napoleon high above the bay
  • Snorkel at Chatham Bay where the coral reef holds the Atlantic at bay which shimmers in all shades from turquoise through to emerald green and invites you to dip your toe
  • Experience beautiful beaches in St. George with aromatic spice plantations/ dense forests/ waterfalls and extinct volcanoes
  • You will notice that the horseshoe shaped bay is surrounded by numerous houses that remind you of colonial times
  • Experience a lifestyle in Bequia where the local population knows how to take things easy
  • Go to the eastern coast where you will find the Old Hegg Turtle Sanctuary focusing on rearing and caring for endangered turtles.

A voyage to see stunning volcanic scenery and island hideaways on the sunny side of the Lesser Antilles and the Grenadines.

Bridgetown, Barbados
On the wild and rugged east coast of Barbados, the isolated beaches are the colour of sunrise, the red sands having blown all the way across the Atlantic from the Sahara. The eastern most island of the Windwards, and indeed, of the entire Caribbean, reaches out to Africa and the Old World, as if not quite part of the New. Bridgetown, Barbados is an interesting town full of contrasts. George Washington actually slept here! Trafalgar Square reminds you that the laid back, rum-and-fun-loving island’s British-influenced heritage includes revered traditions like cricket and high tea.

Soufriere, St. Lucia (overnight)


Soufriere, St. Lucia
Soufriere is a fishing town on St. Lucia's southwest coast. Surrounded by lush tropical rainforest, Soufriere sits below the Pitons, St. Lucia's landmark volcanic peaks. The town is small and simple, with a central square on which is located the Church of the Assumption, and narrow streets lined with bright-painted houses. You can wander with your camera, stop at a local seafood restaurant, or buy some treats to eat from a street vendor, or perhaps linger at a bar for a rum drink. The people are friendly and fun-loving. There are spas for massage, and hot, volcanic spring-fed mineral baths for soaking. Visit an old sugar plantation. Rent a trail bike to ride along the French Wall Trail, an old hand-built stone wall, or any of several other trails. Go diving among the coral formations on the reef in the Soufriere Marine Management Area. Or try snorkeling if you prefer. Take a walk through the rainforest, visit a botanical gardens, or use binoculars to seek the elusive St. Lucia parrot. You'll not lack for things to do on this laid-back island.

Cabrits, Dominica
Cabrits National Park is at the north end of the island, north of Portsmouth on a peninsula. The park protects tropical forest, coral reefs and wetlands. There are hiking trails and an English garrison called Fort Shirley.

Basseterre, St. Kitts
Unlike other islands where traditional lifestyles have been stamped out by mass tourism, St. Kitts boasts a thriving West Indian culture. Her lush and forested slopes rise gracefully to mist-shrouded peaks.

A worthwhile site for history buffs, the imposing 17th century fortress (Brimstone Hill) looms over green fields of sugar cane and banana trees. St. Kitts’ was the first successful colony in the British West Indies. Indeed, when viewed from the top of Brimstone Hill, the “Gibraltar of the Caribbean” appears to dominate everything in the Southern Sea.

Originally discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1493, the island was named for his patron saint, St. Christopher. The British later shortened the name to St. Kitts. The island was colonized beginning in 1623, first by the French, and then by English settlers. Britain and France held the island jointly from 1628 into the 1700's, with periods of fighting. By 1783, the treaty of Paris ceded St. Kitts and Nevis to Great Britain.

Basseterre has been the capital of St. Kitts since 1727, and remains the capital of the Federation of St. Kitts and Nevis today. It offers elegant Georgian architecture and colorful shopping.


North Sound, Virgin Gorda
The North Sound has a rich history. Sir Francis Drake's vessel, the Golden Hind, carried a prize captured on his famous voyage, then weighted below its waterline with gold, and on whose deck he was knighted. Drake spent a few days collecting his fleet in the North Sound before joining the legendary Sir John Hawkins to attack Puerto Rico--back in the days when the Sir Francis Drake Channel was called "Freebooters Gangway."

The North Sound is like another world on Virgin Gorda--a boater's dreamworld. Here are vast anchorages for charterers and other activities in these well protected waters. Fairly frequently you may see tall ships at anchor.

Leave your ship on a dingy and go to Saba Rock or Bitter End for a lovely meal.


Great Harbor/Jost van Dyke (overnight)
Great Harbor is a fascinating melting pot of British Virgin Islanders & visiting sailors who land on this perfect BVI beach and stay a while! Great Harbor is the center of activity for Jost Van Dyke, one of the most popular anchorages for yachts in the BVI, with a variety of beach bars, including the famous Foxy's.

Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke
Great Harbor is a fascinating melting pot of British Virgin Islanders & visiting sailors who land on this perfect BVI beach and stay a while! Great Harbor is the center of activity for Jost Van Dyke, one of the most popular anchorages for yachts in the BVI, with a variety of beach bars, including the famous Foxy's.

White Bay, Jost Van Dyke, BVI
This pristine beach is among the most spectacular in the British Virgins; it is that perfect Caribbean beach one picture's in the mind's eye. A reef runs nearly the length of beach, just a couple of hundred feet offshore, and provides calm water protection for swimmers and snorkelers. A break in the reef allows sailboats to anchor close to the beach.

Gustavia, St. Barthelemy (France)
Discovered by Columbus in 1493, and named for his brother Bartolomeo, St. Barths was first settled in 1648 by French colonists from the nearby island of St. Kitts.

This original settlement was not a successful. In 1651 the island was sold to the Knights of Malta.

France repurchased the island in 1878. The free port status remained, and does to this day, along with such Swedish mementos as bits of architecture, a cemetery, a few street signs and, of course, the name of the harbor and capital, Gustavia.

In 1957, American millionaire David Rockefeller bought a property: the notoriety of the island quickly grew and its transformation as an upscale tourist destination was underway. In 1967, Britain cut loose most of their Caribbean dependencies because they had become a losing proposition.

During the last twenty years the resident population of St. Barths has more than doubled. Fewer natives are leaving, and growing number of outsiders are arriving to make an island home for themselves, especially from Metropolitan France.


At Sea


Terre de Haut, Iles des Saintes


Chatham Bay/Union Island (St Vincent and Grenadines over night)


Chatham Bay, Union Island
A key feature of the Union Island region is the Tobago Cays National Marine Park. The Tobago Cays are a group of small uninhabited islands surrounded by reefs – snorkeling, scuba diving, swimming with the sea turtles are all favorite pastimes of visitors. Entry to the park (for visitors) costs EC$10/person/day – park fees can be paid in Clifton at the Custom's Offices, the Tobago Cays Marine Park office at the waterfront, or in the park itself from park rangers.

St. George's, Grenada
An attractive colonial-era town spilling down a hillside above the Carenage, with its horseshoe-shaped harbor, Grenada's capital of ST GEORGE'S received the full brunt of Hurricane Ivan's high winds, and the bevy of new terracotta-coloured roofs stand in testament to the power of the wind.

St George's won't take more than a day to explore, and it's worth taking time away from the beach to do so. Though the market is at its liveliest on Saturday morning, most shops close on Saturday afternoons, Sundays and public holidays, making the town a quiet place during those times – except when a cruise ship moors at the spanking new docks, in which case the town explodes into a frenzy of activity, market stalls spring up on shore, restaurants and bars fill up, street vendors and local guides come out in force.


Port Elizabeth, Bequia (St. Vincent & Grenadines)
One of the busiest times of the year being the annual Easter Regatta.

Two Scuba diving stores run dive trips to twenty-eight identified dive sites around Bequia. There are several wrecks and shallow caves accessible to advanced divers. It is not unusual to see Hawksbill turtles, lobsters, moray eels and many kinds of fish when diving Bequia.

Bequia is one of the few places in the world where limited whaling is still allowed by the International Whaling Commission. Natives of Bequia are allowed to catch up to 4 Humpback Whales per year using only traditional hunting methods of hand thrown harpoons in small open sailing boats.

The Grenadines is an island chain that is part of St. Vincent and Grenada comprised of 32 islands. From St. Vincent's lush tropical rainforest full of "eco-adventures" to the idyllic beaches, coral reefs and turquoise lagoons of the Grenadines, "SVG" is a tropical paradise for yachting, scuba diving, observing nature and simply just relaxing. Find your own private island and claim your piece of paradise for the day.


Bridgetown, Barbados (return)
Return to Bridgetown for disembarkation

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