Destination Area: Mediterranean Sea
Length: 14 NIGHTS
Vessel: Royal Clipper


Departs:

Cannes, France on June 3, 2017

Returns:

Rome, Italy on June 17, 2017


Prices start at $3,080. per passenger, double occupancy including free air from select U.S. cities. Port charge is $540. per passenger. There may be a discount for children under 18 if accompanied by an adult. Single supplement is 150% for category 2 thru 6 (other categories 200%).

Call for clarification of the above as costs may change.

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For more information view pricing information for the Royal Clipper
or call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

SAILING IN THE TYRRHENIAN SEA TO CORSICA AND SARDINIA AND ALONG THE AMALFI COAST TO ISLANDS OFF THE TIP OF ITALY: 14 Night Voyage From Cannes, France to Rome, Italy

The flagship of Star Clippers' line, The Royal Clipper is the largest full-rigged sailing ship in the world and the only five-masted full-rigged ship ...

Read more about the Royal Clipper     



  • Spend time in L'ile Rousse to experience white sand beaches and a bustling marketplace with cafes huddled beneath the plane trees in the village square
  • At Corsica's east coast Moriani is a family friendly beach with superb white sand and well worth visiting
  • Walk around Bastia and discover the sites of the old port/ the market/ Saint Nicolas place/ cathedral of Saint Mary and the Saint Cross vault
  • Stroll around Portoferraio to see the waterfront with its elegant shops and town square with old churches and terraced streets
  • Visit the walled southeastern town of Porto Vecchio lined with medieval streets
  • Check out the Cervo complex near the marina for sandy beaches/ restaurants and bars
  • Visit Le Forna in Ponza to see architecturally interesting low/ whitewashed houses lined up neatly in rows
  • Notice the picturesque quality of Sorrento's harbor as you approach it
  • Take a tour of Pompeii if you have time
  • Notice the sheer beauty of the Amalfi coast as you approach the harbor
  • Visit an Aeolean museum in Lipari to see exhibits of remains from a dozen ages of man- from prehistoric through the middleage period
  • Allow ample time in Rome before boarding your plane.

Sailing around the Ligurian Sea to Corsica/ Sardinia and along the Amalfi coast to islands off the tip of Italy.

Cannes, France
Cannes is the sister city to Beverly Hills and the chic epicenter of the French Riviera – a world of exclusive boutiques, palm-lined avenues, starlet-studded beaches, and elegant sidewalk cafes. While most famous for its Film Festival in May, at the colossal Palais des Festivals, when international celebrities gather to screen films and make deals, it glitters every month with swimming and sunning by day, and a club and casino scene by night. Cannes is the archetypal Mediterranean resort city, discovered by wealthy English nobles who came to the sunny south of France to escape their draughty old castles during the dreary British winters. Cannes' high-flying lifestyle has attracted notables and the notorious ever since.

St. Margherta, Italy


Corsica, France (L'ile Rousse)


Corsice, France (East Corsica Beach)


Bastia (Old Town), Corsica, France
Bastia is a community in the Haute-Corse area of France located in the northeast of the island of Corsica at the base of Cap Corse. It is also the second-largest city in Corsica after Ajaccio and the capital of the area.

The districts of Terra Vecchia and Terra Nova are intriguing. The long front of the old houses still have the impact of bullets of past wars.


Portoferraio, Elba
Sailing into Portoferraio, you can see why Napoleon chose Elba for his exile; an island of pink granite, pine forests, and pristine beaches. The contrasts of the Elba countryside – from its typical fishing villages and high mountain passes to its stylish summer resorts on the coast – are enchanting. Elba’s restaurants feature excellent seafood, and small private vineyards produce local Moscato and Aleatico wines.

From his villa in Portoferraio, Napoleon, no longer Emperor of France, looked out over the waiting ships in the harbor and dreamed of returning to glory. Today you can enjoy a local vineyard tour, and near Portoferraio, discover the remains of an ancient Etruscan civilisation.


Porto Vecchio, Corsica, France
Porto Vecchiois a fashionable resort town which lies on the magnificent Gulf of Santa Giulia near the southern tip of Corsica. Combine a day at the beach with a visit to one of the prehistoric sites nearby.

Porto Cervo, Sardinia
Porto Cervo is an Italian seaside resort in northern Sardinia. The village is the main center of the Costa Smeralda, on the gulf of the same name. It was created by Prince Karim Aga Khan. Porto Cervo has a resident population of less than 200 inhabitants.

Porto Cervo is home to the Monte di Mola (MdM) art gallery, which is the most important gallery on the Costa Smeralda.

The center of the marina is the village, where there are shops, a newsagent, and a supermarket. Close by is the exclusive Yacht Club Costa Smeralda. The end of the marina holds a shipyard capable of repairing large luxury yachts.

It is also the location of Hotel Cala di Volpe, which is featured in the 1977 James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me. The Presidential Suite of the hotel, billed at $32,736 per night, is listed at number 7 on World's 15 most expensive hotel suites complied by CNN.

Though it's grown massively since being built by the Aga Khan in the 1960s as a village retreat for the rich, Porto Cervo still manages to combine glamor with laid-back cool in a way that's uniquely Italian and perpetually fascinating. And the aquamarine water and spectacular coastline of Sardinia are every bit as beautiful as the people. Summer is the key season, of course, but it's also delightful in September and early October, when the weather is often superb.

Nowhere gives you more of the feel of Porto Cervo than having a bite to eat at the restaurant of the Yacht Club. It's the natural habitat of people who actually buy the kind of swimwear featured in Vogue, and half the fun is pretending you do, too, while casually checking out the film stars and supermodels. Less high-maintenance is Sole e Mare which does alfresco pizza and pasta in the main square of Baja Sardinia.


Rome, Italy
The glorious Roman civilization had its origins in small groups of farmers and shepherds who settled along the banks of the Tiber, on the Palatine hills and the surrounding areas.

The Roman republic was characterized by internal struggles that eventually led to the success of the plebeians (lower class Romans) and a new order of ruling class. The city expanded and gradually, the whole of Lazio, the Italic peninsula and the Mediterranean basin were conquered. For almost four centuries, Rome concentrated her energies on building a strong, solid empire. Mighty conquests came thick and fast: from Sannitic and Tarantine wars, to clashes with Carthage and Syracuse. Rome expanded over land and sea and managed to accomplish what no other civilization had managed i.e. the unification of the East and West.

In the first two centuries of the empire, Rome reached the height of her power, but the first signs of her downfall were already apparent towards the end of the second century.

The causes of Rome's decline are numerous: the empire was unable to control her many subjects, social and economic changes made for an unstable climate as did the forceful arrival of the Barbarians. Christianity also began to spread and emperors tried to unite the empire using religion. Emperors wanted to have their titles sanctified and became Holy Roman Emperors. Emperor Constantine sanctioned the freedom and tolerance of Christians in the empire in his edict of 313 but he unwisely decided to move the capital of the empire to Constantinople undermining the empire's power. The pontificate was re-established in Rome with Gregory XI in 1377. The power of the Popes increased, they were able to assign public offices, which led to clashes and schisms.

The centralizing of the papacy and the power absolute that the church had made a cultural impact. Rome became the centre of artistic life. The face of the city changed, as palaces, villas, piazzas and churches were built. New streets were created and the basilica of Saint Peter was restored. The sack of Rome occurred in 1527, and although the effects were disastrous (all the artists abandoned the city), the wounds were soon healed and a new spirit of rebirth and development enveloped the city. More new districts and streets were created and the population began to move back to the city.

In the 17th century, Rome also had a period of expansion and beautification, largely due to the work of two major artists, Gian Lorenzo Bernini and Francesco Borromini. Clashes continued between the nobility and the populace. Rome's fortune waxed and waned under Napoleonic rule: the church's estates were confiscated and divided amongst French officials and Italian laymen. The city was subject to French rule until the fall of Napoleon III and the annexation of Italy.

Rome became the capital of Italy in 1870 and the city received a huge influx of immigrants; this led to the rapid, and disordered creation of new dwellings. The situation did not become any better with the advent of fascism. During WWII, the city was bombarded heavily by America, causing major damage, particularly in the areas of Verano and Porta Maggiore. The city was attacked during the period of German occupation until the end of the war. From June 2, 1946 Italy chose to be a republic, ousting its monarchy and Rome was chosen as the capital.


Ponza, Italy
Ponza, an island in the Tyrrhenian Sea, trims the island’s eastern coast, a vista of sheer tuff cliffs bleached white by the sun and eroded by water and wind.

Indeed, the best vantage from which to appreciate Ponza is from the sea. During the high summer season — particularly on weekends, when Romans journey two hours to dine on fish and escape the oppressive heat of the capital — waterfront spots accessible by land attract crowds, with hardly an inch to lay your towel on the rocks. But by boat, the island’s charms come to life.

Vessels dock in Ponza’s sheltered port, the largest settlement on the island, which locals refer to simply as Porto. Its boxy houses form a pastel mosaic that traces the volcanic terrain over the area’s two peaks. Restaurants, cafes, bakeries, fishmongers and produce stalls surround the port, which is generally filled with boats. Porto retains the beauty of its origins as a simple fishing village — a destination popular with people from the mainland, but still unspoiled for visitors from afar.


Palmarola (am)
Palmarola is a craggy, mostly uninhabited island in the Tyrrhenian Sea off the west coast of Italy.

Palmarola has an extremely rocky coast dotted with natural grottos, bays, cliffs and crags. The island is primarily a nature reserve, but there are a handful of ports where boats can land and several restaurants that cater to tourists during the summer season.

The famous French explorer and oceanographer, Jacques-Yves Cousteau said that Palmarola is "the most beautiful island in the Mediterranean Sea"


Sorrento, Italy
Sorrento's city walls rise straight out of the sea, and they hold many charms within. Sorrento has been depicted described and immortalised in song by artists, poets and travellers from every period of history. Along the coast, rugged and inaccessible cliffs soar upwards between beautiful beaches, hidden caves, enchanting bays and sheltered coves. Whereas inland, the high plains, rolling hills and lofty mountains are seared by deep valleys to create a truly unique landscape in which man has also left a clear sign of his remarkable work: the more impervious areas have been modelled into the now-famous terraces, those huge steps descending into the sea on which man has planted vinyards and groves of orange, lemon and olive trees. There are the gardens of delight which excude an inebriating perfume of blossom in spring. The mild climate and predominantly fine weather year-round make the Sorrentine Peninsula an ideal destination in any season.

The first town on the peninsula is Vico Equense with its Giusso Castle on the coast and the austere Mont Faito (4,500 feet high). You can pass from the sea to the mountain in just a few minutes. Next we find Meta di Sorrento, a town hidden in a maze of alleyways whose small hamlets and sun-drenched beaches are a must for visitors. Piano di Sorrento is a bustling town which harmoniously blends its sea-faring vocation with its rural identity and its role as a major market center. The hill rising up behind the town is traversed by narrow roads flanked by high walls that enclose centuries-old orange and lemon groves. Optional excursions here might include a trip back in history in Pompeii, where the ashen remains of ancient Romans lie frozen in time.


Amalfi, Italy
What is it about the Amalfi Coast that inspires such rapture? From the time of the Romans, who had grand villas here, Amalfi has been a preferred destination for the wealthy and the artistic. During the Middle Ages, Amalfi was a powerful republic of 70,000 people, a bustling maritime state (the ship compass was invented here) rivaling nearby Ravello.

For a sense of Amalfi's medieval glory, wander through the grand Duomo, which contains the remains of St. Andrew. Or visit Ravello, where the annual music festival is held, or nearby Positano, said to be the most beautiful town in the Mediterranean. Today, it draws crowds and raves for the beauty of its setting, perched on a deep gorge, along the most romantic drive in all Italy; and Positano's Duomo, which mixes Moorish and early-Gothic influences.


Taormina, Sicily, Italy
On the shoulder of Mt. Etna overlooking the green Gulf of Catania, Taormina inspired Goethe to say that "It is the greatest work of art and nature". Shop along the steep, cobblestoned streets of Corso Umberto. Or listen to the ghosts of the ancients in the Greek Theater, where even a whisper can be heard.

Built in the 3rd century B.C., the city was later almost completely renovated by the Romans. Perched on a rocky terrace overlooking the sea, Taormina is a city full of medieval charm and character. Most impressive is the awe-inspiring view; on a clear day one can see the snowcapped peak of Mt. Etna and the jagged cliffs of the rocky coastline soaring high above the sea. Cobblestone streets leads to Palazzo Corvaia, a 15th-century building adorned with classic double windows. Nearby one can find designer boutiques and quaint artisan studios. Taormina also boasts an impressive Greek Theatre built in the 3rd century B.C. not to be missed. Renowned for its width, and for its unique acoustical qualities, it is still used for open-air concerts.

The fortress cathedral, which is what Taormina's main cathedral is considered, was built around the year 1400 on the ruins of a small medieval church. The cathedral has a Latin-cross plan with three aisles; there are six minor altars in the two side aisles. Six monolithic columns hold up the nave, three on each side, in pink Taormina marble and their capitals have a foil and fish-scale decoration. The ceiling of the nave has wooden beams supported by carved corbels reproducing Arabian scenes with a Gothic air.

The city gardens, named after the Duke of Cesarò, were donated by the Cacciola-Trevelyan family during the 1920's. Inside, there is thick vegetation and a typically Mediterranean array of hedges and flowerbeds with cobbled paths. An avenue lined with olive-trees in memory of the fallen during various wars runs among precious trees of various species, some of which are rare and extraordinarily beautiful. In the center and on the northeast end of the gardens, there are some characteristic pagoda-style towers with arabesque designs, made of bricks and edged with lavic pumice-stone. Florence Trevelyan, an English noblewoman, and keen ornithologist, had these towers built to study the birds. Relics from the two World Wars are on show in a few clearings and a war monument to the fallen can be seen near the natural "Teatro di Verzura" (Greenery Theatre).


Lipari, Aeolian Islands, Italy
Italy's seven volcanic Aeolian Islands are obviously a place favored by the Gods. Just off the north coast of Sicily, they are a favorite destination for adventurers and visiting yachts, which anchor in the numerous little harbors indenting the coastline.

Around 580 B.C. Greek colonization began on the Aeolian Islands. Lipari was besieged, in vain, by the Athenians during their expedition to Sicily in 427 B.C., but in 304 B.C. it was plundered by Agatocle from Syracuse who pillaged the wealth of the temples. It was conquered by the Romans in 252 B.C. In the following centuries it fell into decline before flourishing once again under the Normans. In 1544 a tremendous tragedy befell the islands. Lipari was savagely plundered and destroyed by the Turkish fleet and the 9,000 inhabitants became slaves of the occupying force after 10 days of desperate resistance and before help could arrive. The town was repopulated as a result of the privileges and exemptions given to immigrants from Sicily and Southern Italy.

Lipari is a world lost in time where one has a close contact with nature, with its endless beaches, bays, grottoes and the incomparable richness of its seabed. Together with the natural beauty, it is possible to discover many geological and volcanic aspects of the seven thousand years of history when you visit the prehistoric villages and the archeological museum of Lipari, rated among the most important of Europe.


Stromboli, Italy/ Palmarola, Italy


At sea


Rome, Italy
The glorious Roman civilization had its origins in small groups of farmers and shepherds who settled along the banks of the Tiber, on the Palatine hills and the surrounding areas.

The Roman republic was characterized by internal struggles that eventually led to the success of the plebeians (lower class Romans) and a new order of ruling class. The city expanded and gradually, the whole of Lazio, the Italic peninsula and the Mediterranean basin were conquered. For almost four centuries, Rome concentrated her energies on building a strong, solid empire. Mighty conquests came thick and fast: from Sannitic and Tarantine wars, to clashes with Carthage and Syracuse. Rome expanded over land and sea and managed to accomplish what no other civilization had managed i.e. the unification of the East and West.

In the first two centuries of the empire, Rome reached the height of her power, but the first signs of her downfall were already apparent towards the end of the second century.

The causes of Rome's decline are numerous: the empire was unable to control her many subjects, social and economic changes made for an unstable climate as did the forceful arrival of the Barbarians. Christianity also began to spread and emperors tried to unite the empire using religion. Emperors wanted to have their titles sanctified and became Holy Roman Emperors. Emperor Constantine sanctioned the freedom and tolerance of Christians in the empire in his edict of 313 but he unwisely decided to move the capital of the empire to Constantinople undermining the empire's power. The pontificate was re-established in Rome with Gregory XI in 1377. The power of the Popes increased, they were able to assign public offices, which led to clashes and schisms.

The centralizing of the papacy and the power absolute that the church had made a cultural impact. Rome became the centre of artistic life. The face of the city changed, as palaces, villas, piazzas and churches were built. New streets were created and the basilica of Saint Peter was restored. The sack of Rome occurred in 1527, and although the effects were disastrous (all the artists abandoned the city), the wounds were soon healed and a new spirit of rebirth and development enveloped the city. More new districts and streets were created and the population began to move back to the city.

In the 17th century, Rome also had a period of expansion and beautification, largely due to the work of two major artists, Gian Lorenzo Bernini and Francesco Borromini. Clashes continued between the nobility and the populace. Rome's fortune waxed and waned under Napoleonic rule: the church's estates were confiscated and divided amongst French officials and Italian laymen. The city was subject to French rule until the fall of Napoleon III and the annexation of Italy.

Rome became the capital of Italy in 1870 and the city received a huge influx of immigrants; this led to the rapid, and disordered creation of new dwellings. The situation did not become any better with the advent of fascism. During WWII, the city was bombarded heavily by America, causing major damage, particularly in the areas of Verano and Porta Maggiore. The city was attacked during the period of German occupation until the end of the war. From June 2, 1946 Italy chose to be a republic, ousting its monarchy and Rome was chosen as the capital.


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