Destination Area: Mediterranean Sea
Length: 13 NIGHTS
Vessel: Star Flyer


Departs:

Valetta, Malta on April 30, 2017

Returns:

Istanbul, Turkey on May 13, 2017


Prices start at $2,610. per person, double occupancy. Port charge is $500. per passenger. Single supplement is 150% for category 2 thru 6 (other categories 200%).

Call for clarification of the above as costs may change.

Call for air..

For more information view pricing information for the Star Flyer
or call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

SAILING EAST IN THE MEDITERRANEAN AND CROSSING THE MOUTHS OF THE ADRIATIC AND AEGEAN SEAS TO ISTANBUL WITH 13 PORT STOPS ALONG THE WAY: 14 Night Voyage From Valletta, Malta to Istanbul, Turkey

Star Flyer and her sister ship Star Clipper are as fleet as the wind and as graceful as swans. These are 4-masted barkentines, and refle ...

Read more about the Star Flyer     



  • Notice the ruins of Siracusa positioned with its modern port
  • Wander the picturesque lanes of Monemvasia's main square where a Turkish cannon stands near the Elkomenos church
  • Visit Hydra's superb beaches and artists and galleries
  • Notice windmills and white washed houses in Mykonos
  • Shop for Patmian embroidery which is famous for its craftsmanship and go to superb beaches
  • You must visit Ephesus'- world's most impressive and best restored archaeological sites
  • Visit markets and charming streets in Dikili.

Sailing from west to east crossing the mouths of the Adriatic and Aegean seas to Turkey with 12 port visits along the way.

Valetta, Malta
Valletta, Jean de la Valette, French Grand Master of the Order of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem, built the capital after the epic siege of 1565. It dominates, in one wide sweep, the Island's historic Grand Harbour - one of the finest natural ports in Europe. Within its limited boundaries, the city reflects some of Malta's rich heritage of archaeology, history, architecture, art and culture.

The more important collections covering Maltese archaeology are housed in the Auberge de Provence, Valletta, one of the Inns of the Knights of St John. Collections of prehistoric pottery, sculpture, statuettes, stone implements and personal ornaments recovered from the Maltese megalithic temples and other pre-historic sites are exhibited. Typical examples of tomb furniture of the Punic and Roman periods are also displayed. After two years of refurbishment, the Museum now boasts new prehistoric galleries.

The National Museum of Fine Arts, located in an 18th century palace, houses paintings, sculptures, furniture and other exhibits connected with the Order of St John. Works by Domenico di Michelino, Carpaccio, Perugino, Tintoretto, Reni, Valentin, Mathias Stomer, Preti, Tiepolo, Favray and Vernet are permanently displayed.

St. John's Co-Cathedral and Museum, formerly the Conventual Church of the Order, is historically and artistically one of the most important monuments on the island. It was built between 1573 and 1577 to the design of Gerolamo Cassar (1520-1586), chief engineer of the Order. The "Beheading of St John", Caravaggio's masterpiece, hangs in the Oratory. The museum houses a unique collection of Flemish tapestries, silver objects and church vestments.

Malta has beaches for everyone, from windsurfers to sun loungers. Choose from golden sand, red sand, rocks, blue lagoons and even inland seas. There are family beaches, rocky inlets ideal for snorkellers, and beach sunsets for twilight swimmers. On larger beaches, you’ll find cafes, fruit stalls or snack bars open during the season. With Malta’s climate, beach life lasts well into October. Enjoy water sports and activities like windsurfing, jet and water skiing, and para-kiting. You can hire equipment from beach cafes or shops nearby.


Siracusa, Sicily, Italy
Located near the southeastern corner of Sicily on the Ionian coast, Siracusa (Syracuse) is built on an ancient Greek settlement founded by Corinthians in 734 BC. More than any other modern city in Sicily, Syracuse manifests a visible continuity from its ancient Greek past, both historical and mythological. Its older quarter is an island, Ortegia (or Ortygia, from the Greek for "quail," probably named for that bird's abundance in this area). Ortegia is known for, among many other things, the freshwater Spring of Arethusa. When Artemis changed Arethusa into a spring of water to escape the river god Alpheus, it was here that the transformed maiden emerged. On a more factual note, Syracuse was the city of Archimedes, Pindar and Aeschylus. It was the most important city in Magna Graecia, with a population of around 300,000, and for a time rivaled Athens as the most important city of the Greek world.

Athens, Carthage, Rome. These were the only three cities of the ancient Mediterranean world to challenge the power and prosperity of Syracuse during its Golden Age. Though it was an important city from the time of its foundation, Syracuse flourished unhindered after Hieron's victory (with the help of the Agrigentans) over the Carthaginians at Himera, near present-day Termini Imerese, in 480 BC, and soon became the most important Greek city in Sicily, both economically and politically. It would not be overzealous to say that the history of Hellenistic Sicily is largely the history of Syracuse.


At sea


Pilos, Greece
Pylos is a large bay and a town on the west coast of the Peloponnese, in the district of Messenia in southern Greece. It is the capital of Pylia Province. The town of Pylos has 2,561 inhabitants, the municipality of Pylos 5,402 in 2001.

Old Pylos and New Pylos are distinct settlements and castles, several miles apart. Old Pylos is located on the northwest of the bay, while New Pylos is located in the southeast.


Monemvassia, Greece
Monemvasia is located on a small peninsula off the east coast of the Peloponnese in the Greek prefecture of Laconia. The peninsula is linked to the mainland by a short causeway 650 feet in length. Its area consists mostly of a large plateau some 325 feet above sea level, up to 950 feet wide, the site of a powerful medieval fortress. The town walls and many Byzantine churches remain from the medieval period.

The town's name derives from two Greek words, mone and emvasia, meaning "single entrance". Its Italian form, Malvasia, gave its name to Malmsey wine. Monemvasia's nickname is the Gibraltar of the East or The Rock.


Hydra, Greece
It looks barren and rocky, but the narrow harbor of Hydra hides a surprise, a town of stately mansions all built around 1800 by blockade runners who had made fortunes outwitting the British during the Napoleonic Wars. Many of Hydra's merchants were also celebrated naval heroes during the Greek fight for independence from Turkey in the 1820s. Another surprise is that there are no cars, so if you want to see the spectacular view from the Monastery of Ilias you'll have to ride a donkey to the top.

Athens/Piraeus, Greece
The Piraeus is the ancient port of Athens and still functions as the chief exit point from the city by sea for destinations amongst the Aegean Islands and elsewhere in the east Mediterranean. Domestic destinations include all of the Aegean islands except the Sporades and some smaller Cyclades and Dodecanese isles that require a connection. International destinations (apart from cruise ships) include Cyprus and the Middle East.

Mykonos (explore the town)
One of the most cosmopolitan of all the Greek Islands and quite justifiably attracting visitors from all over the world, Mykonos is a contrast of rocky hills and beautiful beaches. Hora, the capital, spreads around a colorful harbor in which fishing boats nestle side by side with luxury yachts. The brilliant white cubic houses with white-washed balconies built close together with little shops and tiny churches, make up the backstreets of the town. The harbor is overlooked by a variety of tavernas, and is a popular meeting place as the sun goes down, turning the brilliant whites to beautiful shades of pinks and reds.

Kos, Greece
Situated only just off the Turkish peninsula of Bodrum is Kos, one of the most fertile islands in the Dodecanese. Like Rhodes, it is abundant with ancient remains and beautiful beaches. The landscape of modern Kos Town, the island's capital and main port, is picturesque and luxurious. The Castle of the Knights prevails over the port, while Hellenistic and Roman ruins are littered everywhere.

Patmos, Greece
Patmos is not a big island, but it is one of the best known. The whole island breathes of faith and devotion.

Nevertheless, there is more to the island than its Christian reputation. There are many nice beaches along the jagged coastline, and the people grow fruits and olives on the green hills. The landscape invites you to take long walks and there is much to discover.


Istanbul, Turkey
Throughout thousands of years, Istanbul's geographical position has maintained its importance. Today it is a huge metropolis connecting continents, cultures and religions, home to eleven million people, and one of the greatest business and cultural centers of the region. Don't miss Topkapi Palace and the Blue Mosque.

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