Destination Area: Baltic Sea/ Scandinavia
Length: 10 NIGHTS
Vessel: Wind Surf


Departs:

Copenhagen, Denmark on August 12, 2017

Returns:

Stockholm, Sweden on August 22, 2017


Discounted fares start at $4,399. per passenger, double occupancy. Advance booking discounts and free shore excursions may be available.

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For more information call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

BALTIC REGION - VISIT SEVEN COUNTRIES AND EIGHT CITIES: 9 Night Voyage From Copenhagen, Denmark to Stockholm, Sweden

Wind Surf is the largest ship in our fleet, and among the most luxurious. Suites are twice the size of standard cabins, and all cabins have a ...

Read more about the Wind Surf     



  • Visit the Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen
  • Don't leave Bornholm without tasting their famous herring
  • Admire massive red brick churches in Gdansk
  • Visit the medieval Old Town in Tallinn
  • Stroll around Art Nouveau building in Helsinki
  • Note Stockholm's canal and bridges- "Venice of the North".

Cruising to 7 countries in the Baltics.

Copenhagen, Denmark
Copenhagen is a major regional center of culture, business, media, and science, as indicated by several international surveys and rankings. Life science, information technology and shipping are important sectors and research & development plays a major role in the city's economy. Its strategic location and excellent infrastructure with the largest airport in Scandinavia located 14 minutes by train from the city center, has made it a regional hub and a popular location for regional headquarters as well as conventions.

Copenhagen has repeatedly been recognized as one of the cities with the best quality of life. It is also considered one of the world's most environmentally friendly cities. The water in the inner harbor is so clean that it can be swum in, and 36% of all citizens commute to work by bicycle. Every day they cycle a combined 1.2 million km.

Since the turn of the millennium, Copenhagen has seen a strong urban and cultural development and has been described as a boom town. This is partly due to massive investments in cultural facilities as well as infrastructure and a new wave of successful designers, chefs and architects. As of 2010, Copenhagen is ranked as the 10th most expensive city in the world according to Forbes.


Bornholm, Denmark
Bornholm is a Danish island in the Baltic Sea located to the east of (most of) the rest of Denmark, the south of Sweden, and the north of Poland. The main industries on the island include fishing, arts and crafts like glass making and pottery using locally worked clay, and dairy farming. Tourism is important during the summer. The topography of the island consists of dramatic rock formations in the north, sloping down towards "pine and deciduous forests" (greatly damaged by storms in the 1950s) and farmland in the middle and sandy beaches in the south.

Gdansk, Poland
It is Poland's principal seaport as well as the capital of the Pomeranian Voivodeship. It is also historically the largest city of the Kashubian region.

Gdansk is an important seaport and industrial center for Poland.

In 1970, Gdansk was the scene of anti-regime demonstrations which led to the downfall of Poland's communist leader Wladyslaw Gomulka. Ten years later the Gdansk Shipyard was the birthplace of the Solidarity trade union movement, whose opposition to the Communist regime led to the end of Communist Party rule in 1989, and sparked a series of protests that successfully overturned the Communist regimes of the former Soviet bloc.

Today Gdansk is a major shipping port and tourist destination and has been the setting for a number of major open air concerts.

Most tourist attractions are located along or near Ulica Dluga (Long Street) and Dlugi Targ (Long Market), a pedestrian thoroughfare surrounded by buildings reconstructed in historical (primarily 17th century) style and flanked at both ends by elaborate city gates. This part of the city is sometimes referred to as the Royal Road as the former path of processions for visiting kings.

There are also beaches along the Baltic coast to be visited by all.


Klaipeda, Lithuania
Located at the mouth of the Curonian Lagoon, Klaipeda is Lithuania's only seaport.Some of its older buildings have picturesque half-timbered construction, similar to that found in Germany, France, England, Denmark and southern Sweden.

The Soviets transformed Klaipeda, the foremost ice-free port in the Eastern Baltic, into the largest piscatorial-marine base in the European USSR.Until the 1970s, Klaipeda was only important to the USSR for its economy, while cultural and religious activity was minimal and restricted.

There are cinemas, theaters, and multiple museums for tourists to see. There are 6 major shopping centers.


Tallin, Estonia
In addition to longtime functions as seaport and capital city, Tallinn has seen development of an information technology sector in recent years.

Since independence, improving air and sea transport links with Western Europe and Estonia's accession to the European Union have made Tallinn easily accessible to tourists.

The main attractions are in the two old towns (Lower Town and Toompea) which are both easily explored on foot. In Toompea, the major attractions are the walls and various bastions of Castrum Danorum, the Russian Orthodox Alexander Nevsky Cathedral and the Lutheran Cathedral. In Lower Town, major sights include Raekoja plats, the town walls and towers, and St Olaf church tower.


Helsinki, Finland
Helsinki is Finland's capital for business, education, research, culture, and government.

The biggest historical museum in Helsinki is the National Museum of Finland, which displays a vast historical collection from prehistoric times to the 21st century. The museum building itself, a national romantic style neo-medieval castle, is a tourist attraction.

The Finnish National Gallery consists on three museums: Ateneum Art Museum for classical Finnish art, Sinebrychoff Art Museum for classical European art, and Kiasma Art Museum for modern art.

Helsinki has three major theatres.


St. Petersburg, Russia (overnight)
Founded by Tsar Peter I of Russia on 27 May, 1703, it was the capital of the Russian Empire for more than two hundred years. Saint Petersburg ceased being the capital in 1918 after the Russian Revolution of 1917.

During the first few years of its existence the city grew spontaneously around Trinity Square on the right bank of the Neva, near the Peter and Paul Fortress.

The Commission of Stone Buildings of Moscow and Saint Petersburg established in 1762 ruled that no structure in the city be higher than the Winter Palace and prohibited spacing between buildings. During the reign of Catherine the Great in the 1760s-1780s the banks of the Neva were lined with granite embankments. However, it wasn't until 1850 that it was allowed to open the first permanent bridge across the Neva, Blagoveshchensky Bridge.

In the 1920s-1930s the poor outskirts were reconstructed into regularly planned boroughs.

After the death of Stalin the perceived ornamental excesses of the Stalinist architecture were abandoned.

On the territory between the Neva and Nevsky Prospekt the Church of the Savior on Blood, Mikhailovsky Palace housing the Russian Museum, Field of Mars, St. Michael's Castle, Summer Garden, Tauride Palace, Smolny Institute and Smolny Convent are located.

Many notable landmarks are situated to the west and south of the Admiralty Building, including the Trinity Cathedral, Mariinsky Palace, Hotel Astoria, famous Mariinsky Theatre, New Holland Island, Saint Isaac's Cathedral, the largest in the city, and Decembrists Square with the Bronze Horseman, 18th century equestrian monument to Peter the Great, which is considered among the city's most recognisable symbols.

Saint Petersburg is home to more than two hundred museums, many of them hosted in historic buildings.

Saint Petersburg is home to numerous parks and gardens, some of the most famous of which are situated in the southern suburbs, including one of the largest English gardens of Europe in Pavlovsk.

Among the city's more than fifty theaters is the world-famous Mariinsky Theater, home to the Mariinsky Ballet company and opera.


St. Petersburg, Russia
Founded by Tsar Peter I of Russia on 27 May, 1703, it was the capital of the Russian Empire for more than two hundred years. Saint Petersburg ceased being the capital in 1918 after the Russian Revolution of 1917.

During the first few years of its existence the city grew spontaneously around Trinity Square on the right bank of the Neva, near the Peter and Paul Fortress.

The Commission of Stone Buildings of Moscow and Saint Petersburg established in 1762 ruled that no structure in the city be higher than the Winter Palace and prohibited spacing between buildings. During the reign of Catherine the Great in the 1760s-1780s the banks of the Neva were lined with granite embankments. However, it wasn't until 1850 that it was allowed to open the first permanent bridge across the Neva, Blagoveshchensky Bridge.

In the 1920s-1930s the poor outskirts were reconstructed into regularly planned boroughs.

After the death of Stalin the perceived ornamental excesses of the Stalinist architecture were abandoned.

On the territory between the Neva and Nevsky Prospekt the Church of the Savior on Blood, Mikhailovsky Palace housing the Russian Museum, Field of Mars, St. Michael's Castle, Summer Garden, Tauride Palace, Smolny Institute and Smolny Convent are located.

Many notable landmarks are situated to the west and south of the Admiralty Building, including the Trinity Cathedral, Mariinsky Palace, Hotel Astoria, famous Mariinsky Theatre, New Holland Island, Saint Isaac's Cathedral, the largest in the city, and Decembrists Square with the Bronze Horseman, 18th century equestrian monument to Peter the Great, which is considered among the city's most recognisable symbols.

Saint Petersburg is home to more than two hundred museums, many of them hosted in historic buildings.

Saint Petersburg is home to numerous parks and gardens, some of the most famous of which are situated in the southern suburbs, including one of the largest English gardens of Europe in Pavlovsk.

Among the city's more than fifty theaters is the world-famous Mariinsky Theater, home to the Mariinsky Ballet company and opera.


Stockholm, Sweden
Stockholm has been the cultural, media, political, and economic center of Sweden since the 13th century.

Stockholm's core, the present Old Town was built on the central island next to Helgeandsholmen between 1300 and 1500. The strategic and economic importance of the city made Stockholm an important factor in relations between the Danish Kings of the Kalmar Union and the national independence movement in the 15th century. During the latter half of the 20th century, Stockholm became a modern, technologically-advanced, and ethnically diverse city.

Stockholm is Sweden's financial centre.

Stockholm offers plenty of museums, amusement parks, theaters and festivals for tourists to enjoy.


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