Destination Area: Caribbean Ocean/Gulf Of Mexico
Length: 6 NIGHTS
Vessel: Ponant


Departs:

Pointe-a-Pitre, Guadeloupe on December 11, 2017

Returns:

Pointe-a-Pitre, Guadeloupe on December 17, 2017


Fares begin at $5,540. per passenger, double occupancy. Gratuities included in the fare are: ground transportation and limited guided tours, all meals on land and at sea, daily cocktail hour, all day soft drinks and wine with dinner aboard ship.

Call for air.


For more information call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

A GOLF SPECIAL SAIL: 6 Night, Round Trip Voyage From Point a Pitre, Guadeloupe

Le Ponant is an exclusive, modern, luxury vessel, a three-masted schooner accommodating just 64 guests. She was built in France in 1991, speci ...

Read more about the Ponant     



  • Enjoy your game and test yourself on the water hazards of the courses in Basseterre and Anguilla
  • Discover Colonial architecture and idyllic beaches
  • Take in the panoramic views over the Caribbean Sea in Nevis

This is a "golf special" sail with exceptional courses selected.

Pointe-a-Pitre, Guadeloupe
The port city of Guadeloupe, Pointe-à-Pitre, is located on the Grande-Terre side of the butterfly-shaped island of Guadeloupe. It's narrow streets are filled during the day with colorful crowds. Along the waterfront are cafes where you may sit to enjoy the passing scene. Or enjoy the outdoor market in the early morning. Take in the shopping at your leisure.

Nevis, Leeward Islands
Almost completely circular, Nevis' green slopes rise in sweeping curves to the islands summit. From a distance, Nevis looks like a snow-capped mountain, but it's just clouds and mist hovering around Nevis Peak. Charlestown is a well-preserved village with plantation estates and 18th century buildings decorated with gingerbread trim. An interesting zoning law requires that no buildings be taller than the palm trees. Be sure to try the Calalloo soup while you are here.

Basseterre, St. Kitts
Unlike other islands where traditional lifestyles have been stamped out by mass tourism, St. Kitts boasts a thriving West Indian culture. Her lush and forested slopes rise gracefully to mist-shrouded peaks.

A worthwhile site for history buffs, the imposing 17th century fortress (Brimstone Hill) looms over green fields of sugar cane and banana trees. St. Kitts’ was the first successful colony in the British West Indies. Indeed, when viewed from the top of Brimstone Hill, the “Gibraltar of the Caribbean” appears to dominate everything in the Southern Sea.

Originally discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1493, the island was named for his patron saint, St. Christopher. The British later shortened the name to St. Kitts. The island was colonized beginning in 1623, first by the French, and then by English settlers. Britain and France held the island jointly from 1628 into the 1700's, with periods of fighting. By 1783, the treaty of Paris ceded St. Kitts and Nevis to Great Britain.

Basseterre has been the capital of St. Kitts since 1727, and remains the capital of the Federation of St. Kitts and Nevis today. It offers elegant Georgian architecture and colorful shopping.


Gustavia, St. Barthelemy (France)
Discovered by Columbus in 1493, and named for his brother Bartolomeo, St. Barths was first settled in 1648 by French colonists from the nearby island of St. Kitts.

This original settlement was not a successful. In 1651 the island was sold to the Knights of Malta.

France repurchased the island in 1878. The free port status remained, and does to this day, along with such Swedish mementos as bits of architecture, a cemetery, a few street signs and, of course, the name of the harbor and capital, Gustavia.

In 1957, American millionaire David Rockefeller bought a property: the notoriety of the island quickly grew and its transformation as an upscale tourist destination was underway. In 1967, Britain cut loose most of their Caribbean dependencies because they had become a losing proposition.

During the last twenty years the resident population of St. Barths has more than doubled. Fewer natives are leaving, and growing number of outsiders are arriving to make an island home for themselves, especially from Metropolitan France.


Road Bay, Anguilla
Road Bay is a commercial freight port in Anguilla, but it is also known for its calm, protected waters and water sports activities. The beach is long and features everything from bars to restaurants and shopping.

Seclusion and privacy are part of the draw to Anguilla's beaches, and you'll find a bit of that style of travel at Road Bay though you'll never be too far away, either. Neither too close nor too far from cities you'll have everything you need.


Nevis, Leeward Islands
Almost completely circular, Nevis' green slopes rise in sweeping curves to the islands summit. From a distance, Nevis looks like a snow-capped mountain, but it's just clouds and mist hovering around Nevis Peak. Charlestown is a well-preserved village with plantation estates and 18th century buildings decorated with gingerbread trim. An interesting zoning law requires that no buildings be taller than the palm trees. Be sure to try the Calalloo soup while you are here.

Pointe-a-Pitre, Guadeloupe
The port city of Guadeloupe, Pointe-à-Pitre, is located on the Grande-Terre side of the butterfly-shaped island of Guadeloupe. It's narrow streets are filled during the day with colorful crowds. Along the waterfront are cafes where you may sit to enjoy the passing scene. Or enjoy the outdoor market in the early morning. Take in the shopping at your leisure.

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