Destination Area: Pacific Coast, U.S. to Central America
Length: 13 NIGHTS
Vessel: Sea Cloud


Departs:

Colon, Panama on December 22, 2017

Returns:

Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica on January 4, 2018


Call for flight arrangements, fares and specific shore excursions which may be available.
For more information view pricing information for the Sea Cloud
or call us toll free at 1-877-882-4395.

SAILING THROUGH THE PANAMA CANAL FROM THE CARIBBEAN TO THE PACIFIC AND UP THE COAST TO COSTA RICA: 13 Night Voyage From Colon, Panama to Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica

Sea Cloud is a unique and romantic sailing vessel, with a fascinating history. She is a four-masted barque, spreading some 32,000 square feet ...

Read more about the Sea Cloud     



  • You'll be absolutely thrilled to experience ocean to ocean transit through the Panama Canal
  • Watch ships coming and going- raised and lowered in the locks
  • Enjoy sailing around the Pearl Islands with white sandy beaches and turquoise waters
  • Coiba National Park is a great place to snorkel where you will see parrotfish/ purple fairy maidens/ big eyed red squirrelfish and others darting in and out of orange stag coral and purple sea fins
  • View from the ship- Casa Orquidea to see a beautifully landscaped private tropical garden with hundreds of species of ornamental plants
  • At Playa San Josecito relax on the stunning beach(s)and soak up the beauty
  • Roam around the once sleepy village- San Juan Del Sur to see the people and clapboard Victorian houses
  • When you set foot on the fine grain sand in Tortuga Island you'll be amazed by the number of coconut palm trees/ white sandy beaches and emerald waters
  • Take an adventurist "zip line" to see the views

Sailing thru the Panama Canal, around the southern tip of Panama then up the coast to Costa Rica

Colon, Panama
Colon is the Caribbean Ocean terminus of the Panama Canal. A veritable crossroads of the world, you will see all manner of vessels here, awaiting their turn to transit the canal. Only the largest war ships, tankers and cruise ships are too large for the canal.
The city is the capital of Panama's Colón Province. The city was founded in 1850 as one end of the Panama Railroad then under construction. For a number of years early in its history, the sizable United States emigré community called the town Aspinwall while the Hispanic community called it "Colón". The name "Colón" is in honor of Christopher Columbus.

Much of the city was burned during a Colombian civil war in 1885, and again in an accidental fire in 1915. In 1900 the population was some 3,000 people. It grew ten-fold with the building of the Panama Canal. In 1953 Colón was made a Free Trade Zone.


Transit Panama Canal
The Panama Canal is a major ship canal that traverses the Isthmus of Panama in Central America, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The construction of the canal was one of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken. It has had an enormous impact on shipping, as ships no longer have to travel the long and treacherous route via the Drake Passage and Cape Horn at the southernmost tip of South America. A ship sailing from New York to San Francisco via the canal travels 6,000 miles, well under half the distance of the previous 14,000 mile route around Cape Horn.

Colon, Panama
Colon is the Caribbean Ocean terminus of the Panama Canal. A veritable crossroads of the world, you will see all manner of vessels here, awaiting their turn to transit the canal. Only the largest war ships, tankers and cruise ships are too large for the canal.
The city is the capital of Panama's Colón Province. The city was founded in 1850 as one end of the Panama Railroad then under construction. For a number of years early in its history, the sizable United States emigré community called the town Aspinwall while the Hispanic community called it "Colón". The name "Colón" is in honor of Christopher Columbus.

Much of the city was burned during a Colombian civil war in 1885, and again in an accidental fire in 1915. In 1900 the population was some 3,000 people. It grew ten-fold with the building of the Panama Canal. In 1953 Colón was made a Free Trade Zone.


Islas de las Perlas, Panama
The Pearl are a group of about 39 islands and 100 islets (many of them are small and uninhabited) located in the heart of the Gulf of Panama , about 30 miles from the coast of the isthmus of Panama and with a total area of 723 square miles , the archipelago administratively belongs to the Balboa District within the province of Panama .

The name comes from the abundance of pearls that existed in the area during the period of Spanish rule. This area was found the famous Peregrina Pearl who possessed Philip II and later owned by actress Elizabeth Taylor , until her death in 2011. Isla de las Perlas and other nearby islands are also known for their incredible number and diversity of fish and marine species. This archipelago is considered one of the best sport fishing spots in the world.


Isla De Coiba, Panama
Isla de Coiba is a massive island at the center of the Coiba National Park in Panama. Located approximately 30 miles off the Panamanian cost, Isla de Coiba is remote and relatively undeveloped with over 80% of its natural habitat intact. It has the second-largest coral reef in the eastern Pacific Ocean and the waters are filled with some big fish as well, as in orcas, dolphins, humpback whales, whale sharks, manta rays, barracudas, tiger sharks, and more. The jungles of Coiba are home to howler monkeys, scarlet macaws, and crested eagles.

The North end of Coiba is the most visited shore and home to beautiful white sand beaches with clear water. Isla de Coiba is a popular playground for divers and day visitors due to its close proximity to other islands such as Rancheria and Las Canales. The South end of the Isla de Coiba is more remote and offers large waves and pristine beaches. The South shore offers untarnished nature and no crowds, which tends to draw surfers staying in Santa Catalina who are looking for a memorable ride.


Golfito, Costa Rica
The port city of Golfito is located in Puntarenas Province on the southern Pacific Coast of Costa Rica, near the border of Panama. Golfito Bay is within the larger Golfo Dulce, and separated from the open Pacific Coast by the famous Osa Peninsula. Frequent ferry boats cross the Golfo Dulce from Golfito to Puerto Jimenez, which is the primary access point for the Osa Peninsula and Corcovado National Park region. The beaches in the region are some of the most beautiful in the country. Calm water provides for many peaceful tourist activities, even during the tide fluctuation, which averages about 9 feet. The city offers marinas, a duty-free port, yachting and boating services, sport fishing, and a destination for cruise ships. Much of the tourism in the Golfito area focuses on the sport fishing industry. Many of the lodges and hotels have their own sport fishing fleets, and experienced boat captains. Yachting, boating, water sports and beach activities are also popular pastimes. The beaches south of Golfito offer excellent surfing - Zancudo, Pilon and Pavones.

This coastal town was born in 1938, when the United Fruit Company established its banana plantations here. Built from scratch in a unique plantation style, Golfito soon became the main banana shipping port in Costa Rica. In 1985 “the Big Fruit” company pulled out and today Golfito is a sleepy little town, but it has much to offer in terms of sheer beauty. You can hire a water taxi to explore the nearby beaches, take advantage of the world-class deep-sea fishing or visit the beautiful Casa Orquísdeas (Orchid House).


Anchorage Casa Orgideas, Costa Rica
Casa de Orquideas is located in the South Pacific region of Costa Rica. The Orchid House is approximately 15 minutes boat ride from Golfito, many worlds away and a sanctuary for botanists and nature lovers. The gardens are well maintained with orchids and other unusual plant life attracting over 100 bird species to the grounds.

Playa San Josecito, Costa Rica
South of Rio Claro, Playa San Josecito is the longest stretch of white sand beach on this side of the Peninsula de Osa. It is popular with swimmers, snorkelers and sunbathers. For those who would prefer a more active life, horseback riding or hiking into Corcovado National Park is a good bet.

San Juan del Sur, Costa Rica


Playas del Coco, Costa Rico
Playas del Coco is among the most well known beaches in the country. Located near the Golfo de Papagayo, this beautiful beach is easily accessible by all.

A very popular area for sport fishing, Playas del Coco is the largest village in Guanacaste province. Known primarily as the gateway for surfers to reach places like Ollie’s Point and Witches Rock, where the waves are superb, this busy beach is a prime scuba diving spot.

Very popular among the locals, Playas del Coco has a well developed infrastructure, with good roads and plenty of shops, restaurants, bars, discos, casinos, hotels, resorts and markets. The nightlife here is also quite good, so if you happen to visit the area during Christmas or Easter week expect to find a lot of people here partying ‘beach style.’

The beach of Playas del Coco itself is a grayish brown and the tide here often remains quite low. Surrounded by steep cliffs and hills, this horseshoe shaped bay area is the ideal place to have some fun. However, if you are looking for a quiet spot to relax, try staying away from the center of town, where most of the fun happens.


Islas Tortugas, Costa Rica
Isla Tortuga is a beautiful tropical island located in the province of North Puntarenas. A favorite destination for many tourists, cruises are very popular for those who wish to visit the island from other cities in the country.

The peaceful Isla Tortuga is situated just off the southern tip of the Nicoya Peninsula, which is home to a number of indigenous Tico villages, pristine beaches, and beautiful wildlife reserves and refuges.

Visitors to the island will immediately be struck by the abundance of coconut palm trees, white sand beaches and emerald waters that are perfect sites for a relaxing vacation.


Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica
Puerto Caldera is, as the name implies, a port complex for both cruise ships and cargo vessels, its beginnings dating back to 1577. It serves as the primary access point from the Pacific Coast to the capital of San Jose.

The unspoiled natural beauty of the region is one of Puerto Caldera's main attractions. Its rain forests, starting just inside the coastline, continue up into the mountains, contain rivers, waterfalls, national parks and wildlife preserves. South of Puerto Caldera are two forest reserves, known for large and diverse populations of forest and aquatic birds. These are the Biological Reserve of Carara, and a preserve that encompasses Guayabo, Negritos and Los Pajaros islands.


Find a Voyage
Destination:
Vessel Preference:
Voyage Duration:
Departing Between:
Date selection widget
and
Date selection widget

Questions

We are available Monday thru Friday 9am to 5pm (Eastern Time) to answer any questions you might have, to help you plan your vacation or to assist you in choosing the perfect voyage under sail.

CALL US TOLL FREE

1-877-882-4395

Join Our Newsletter

Receive our complimentary monthly newsletter filled with in-depth tall ship profiles, news of tall ship events around the world, as well as special offers for unique or promotional voyages. Enter your email address and click to sign-up.

SubscribeUnsubscribe
Privacy Statement